Swedish royal family in Stockholm for Queen Silvia’s birthday

Just in time for Christmas! Swedish royal family are reunited in Stockholm for an event marking Queen Silvia’s 75th birthday (with one princess jetting in from FLORIDA)

  • Queen Silvia and King Carl XVI Gustaf were joined by children and partners 
  • Royal family were attending a seminar to mark Silvia’s upcoming 75th birthday
  • Princess Madeleine, 36, jetted in from US with husband Christopher O’Neill 
  • Crown Princess Victoria’s six-year-old daughter Princess Estelle was also there 
  • The birthday queen looked remarkably youthful in a fuschia buttoned skirt suit 
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Sweden’s royal family were reunited in Stockholm today for an event marking the queen’s 75th birthday.

Queen Silvia and King Carl XVI Gustaf were joined by their three children – one of whom jetted in from the States for the occasion – and their partners for a seminar at Oscar Theatre on Tuesday.

Crown Princess Victoria, 41 and Princess Madeleine, 36, were matching in patterned floral dresses while their sister-in-law Princess Sofia, 34, dazzled in a crimson midi dress that was cinched in at the waist. 

The birthday queen, meanwhile, looked remarkably youthful in a fuschia buttoned skirt suit teamed with a glittering brooch.

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Swedish royals assemble! L-R: Prince Daniel, Crown Princess Victoria, Princess Estelle, Queen Silvia, King Carl XVI Gustaf, Princess Sofia, Prince Carl Philip, Princess Madeleine and Chrisopher O’Neill descend on Oscar Theatre in Stockholm for a seminar on 18 December

They were also joined by their granddaughter and second-in-line to the throne, six-year-old Princess Estelle. 

Their youngest daughter, Princess Madeleine, recently relocated to Florida with husband Christopher O’Neill and their three young children, but looked delighted to be back with her family on Tuesday.

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Today’s seminar, for guests invited by the Queen, focused on issues close to the royal’s heart including children’s rights, dementia care, and drug prevention.

It was announced earlier this year as part of the consort’s ongoing birthday celebrations, which will include a reception at the Royal Palace on Wednesday. 


L-R Prince Daniel, his wife Crown Princess Victoria, daughter Princess Estelle and Queen Silvia in Stockholm today for a seminar marking the queen consort’s upcoming 75th birthday


The royal couple with their daughter-in-law Princess Sofia, right. They were also joined by their granddaughter and second-in-line to the throne, six-year-old Princess Estelle, left


Princess Madeleine, pictured, recently relocated to Florida with husband Christopher O’Neill and their three young children, but looked delighted to be back with her family on Tuesday

Silvia has also taken part in a series of documentaries to mark her 75th birthday, and during a rare interview this week she admitted it was ‘a big shock’ to learn of her father’s Nazi links following his death in 1990. 

She discovered in 2002 that her late father, Walther Sommerlath, became a member of the Nazi party during the 1930s and spoke about the impact it had on her family.

According to Royal Central, she told Drottning Silvia 75 år [Queen Silvia at 75] that she didn’t believe the revelations at first but ‘when I got to see the evidence in black and white, I had to accept it’.

She added: ‘I’m not trying to detract from the fact that he had become a member. But you may have to think “Why did he do it?” 


L-R Princess Sofia, her brother Prince Carl Philip and her sister-in-law Princess Madeleine. It was announced earlier this year as part of the consort’s ongoing birthday celebrations, which will include a reception at the Royal Palace on Wednesday


The royal couple arrive at Oscar Theatre for today’s seminar. Silvia has recently taken part in a series of documentaries to mark her 75th birthday, and during a rare interview this week she admitted it was ‘a big shock’ to learn of her father’s Nazi links following his death in 1990

‘He and many others did not know what would happen after. Had he known, I don’t believe he would have become a member.’ 

When Silvia married into the Swedish monarchy in 1976, her German father denied he had ever been a member of the Nazi party. It later emerged that he had joined the movement in 1934.

Queen Silvia admitted this week that she has since carried out extensive research in a bid to understand more about her father’s involvement with the NSDAP since the scandal was exposed in a Swedish newspaper in 2002.

Eight years later, in 2010, the revelations about Sommerlath – who was living in Brazil at the time he joined the party and only returned to Germany on the eve of war – plunged the royal family into crisis.


Sweden’s Queen Silvia, pictured in Stockholm last week, has admitted it was ‘a big shock’ to learn of her father’s Nazi links following the late businessman’s death in 1990


Silvia Sommerlath, now Queen Silvia, with her parents Walther and Alice and her brother Joerg at Arlanda airport, two days ahead of her wedding to Swedish King Carl XVI Gustaf in 1976


Sweden’s Queen Silvia, right, arrives with her parents Alice, center, and Walther Sommerlath, left, at the Nobel Prize ceremony in Stockholm in 1981. When she married in 1976 the Queen’s German father denied he had ever been a member of the Nazi party


Sweden’s future Queen Silvia Sommerlath holds her father’s hand in a childhood photo. Revelations about Sommerlath – who was living in Brazil at the time he joined the Nazi party and only returned to Germany on the eve of war – plunged the royal family into crisis in 2010

But in 2011, a fresh report claimed that although Sommerlath belonged to the NSDAP Nazi party, he appeared to have been an inactive member and had even helped a Jewish businessman escape the Holocaust.

Sommerlath resettled in Berlin and on 24 May 1939 he took over the company Wechsler & Hennig.

According to Royal Central, Queen Silvia discovered in her research that her father had in fact helped Jewish Ernst Wechsler, a Jewish man, to flee Germany by trading his coffee plantation in Brazil for ownership of the firm.

Queen Silvia added: ‘It’s been 30 years since he died so now I think it is enough. I want to say to the Swedish people that I am at ease with it. I know that my dad is not the person that people have created him to be.’

Who’s who in the Swedish royal family?

King Carl XVI Gustaf (born in 1946) and Queen Silvia (born in 1943) are the head of the Swedish royal family, also known as the House of Bernadotte.

Crown Princess Victoria, Duchess of Västergötland (born in 1977), is their eldest daughter and heir to the throne. She is married to Prince Daniel, Duke of Västergötland, and they have Princess Estelle, Duchess of Östergötland, born 2012, and Prince Oscar, Duke of Skåne, born 2016.


Their eldest son is Prince Carl Philip, Duke of Värmland (born 1979). He is married to Princess Sofia, Duchess of Värmland, and they have Prince Alexander, Duke of Södermanland, born 2016, and Prince Gabriel, born in 2017.

Their youngest daughter is Princess Madeleine, Duchess of Hälsingland and Gästrikland, born 1982, who is married to Christopher O’Neill. They have Princess Leonore, Duchess of Gotland, and Prince Nicolas, Duke of Ångermanland, born 2015, and Princess Adrienne, born in 2018. The couple recently swapped London for Florida.

Princess Birgitta is also a member of the Royal House. She is the King’s second sister and the widow of Prince Johann Georg of Hohenzollern.

Princess Margaretha, Mrs. Ambler, the King’s first sister, and his third sister, Princess Désirée, Baroness Silfverschiöld, who is married to Baron Niclas Silfverschiöld, and Princess Christina, Mrs. Magnuson, who is the King’s fourth sister and married to Consul General Tord Magnuson, are also members of the Royal Family.

The King’s aunts, Marianne Bernadotte, Countess of Wisborg, and Gunnila Bernadotte, Countess of Wisborg, are also listed. 

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