Duchess Kate had a ’roundtable discussion’ with politicians about Early Years

Y’all remember the Keenwell Institute for Buttons and Early Years? AKA “a dusty desk in Kensington Palace.” The Keenwell Institute is actually the Royal Foundation Centre for Early Childhood, and it’s just Kate’s latest busywork scheme to make it look like she founded a major, groundbreaking initiative and institute devoted to her core issue, Early Years. The Keenwell Institute gives Kate an excuse to do photo-ops in blazers and say things like “my pie chart shows that people believe early childhood development is important!” Speaking of, that’s exactly what Kate was doing today. People Magazine just published Kensington Palace’s press release, basically:

Kate Middleton led her first roundtable discussion with U.K. politicians on Thursday as she championed her royal work on early childhood development. The royal mom of three urged that there is “more we can all do” to prioritize the well-being of children, whether it be directly helping a child or “by investing in the adults around them.”

Kate, who launched her Royal Foundation Centre for Early Childhood last year, said in a statement, “Our experiences in early childhood fundamentally impact our whole life and set the foundation for how we go on to thrive as individuals, with one another, as a community and as a society.”

The meeting largely focused on findings by the Royal Foundation Centre for Early Childhood, which showed that 90% of people agree that the early years are important in shaping children’s lives, but less than 20% recognise that the first five years of a child’s life are crucial to their outcomes later in life.

“The findings published today present us with a huge opportunity and demonstrate there is a real appetite from the public to bring this issue up on all of our agendas. There is more we can all do — every member of society can play a key role, whether that is directly with a child or by investing in the adults around them — the parents, the carers, the early years workforce and more,” she continued. “If we come together to raise the importance of early childhood development, we’ll soon see that healthy, happy individuals make for a healthier, happier world, which is why every second we spend with a child, is an investment in our collective future.”

The research, conducted by Ipsos UK, found that 70% of people believe, like Kate, that the early years should be more of a priority across society and the majority of people (55%) recognize that a person’s mental wellbeing is affected by their childhood experiences. Kate and her foundation believe there is a “huge opportunity to shape the future of our society by focusing on the importance of early childhood to lifelong outcomes.”

[From People]

Just so we’re clear, the basis of ALL of this is Kate’s stupid Five Big Questions, which she copied from some half-remembered childhood development textbook written decades ago. The results from the survey were so asinine, KP had to pad the results with data gathered by other methods, like the Ipsos “research” Kate is now citing in her “report.” As for the report, she’s arguing that… people don’t understand that the early years are important. That’s it. Remember this too: in Kate’s mind, her Early Years work boils down to “if you don’t get it right in the first five years, your life is garbage.” Don’t worry, she also believes that the key to early child development is coming from wealthy two-parent households as well. She said all of this in front of “Health Secretary Sajid Javid, Minister for Families Will Quince and officials from the Health and Social Care and Education departments.” How embarrassing for those professional men and women, that they had to sit through this meeting with Katie Keen and her pie charts.

Photos courtesy of Instar.

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