Prada announces it will stop using animal fur in designs

Prada Group is the latest to announce it’s ditching fur from collections to meet ‘the demand for ethical products’

  • Prada Group, which includes Miu Miu, Church’s, and Car Shoe, will stop using fur
  • Fashion house Prada previously sold mink, fox and rabbit fur in their designs
  • Company said change will start after women’s Spring/Summer 2020 collection
  • They join brands such as Chanel, Gucci, Burberry and Versace in going fur-free

Luxury designer Prada has announced that it will no longer use animal fur in its designs starting from next February.

The Italian fashion house Prada Group, which includes brands Miu Miu, Church’s, and Car Shoe, said they are ‘meeting the demand for ethical products.’

Previously Prada had sold a range of products including hats and coats from mink, fox and rabbit fur.

Animal charity Humane Society International worked with Prada after running a public campaign urging the brand to follow in the footsteps of brands such as Coach, Burberry and Chanel by dropping fur. 

Italian fashion house Prada Group has announced it will no longer use animal fur. Pictured is a model in a fur helmet during the Prada Fall/Winter 2006/2007 men’s fashion show in Milan

Prada Group also own brands Miu Miu, Church’s, and Car Shoe. Pictured are a pair of £610 Prada sandals, now marked down to £418, made from leather and ‘lamb fur’

The organisation hailed the move as one of the most significant fur-free fashion statements yet in its ongoing campaign to end the use of all fur worldwide.

Head designer Miuccia Prada, 70, said: ‘The Prada Group is committed to innovation and social responsibility.

‘Our fur-free policy – reached following a positive dialogue with the Fur Free Alliance, in particular with LAV and the Humane Society of the United States – is an extension of that engagement. 

‘Focusing on innovative materials will allow the company to explore new boundaries of creative design while meeting the demand for ethical products.’


Previously Prada sold a range of products including hats and coats from mink, fox and rabbit fur. Pictured left is a Prada coat with a mink fur collar and right is a fox fur-trimmed down coat

Animal charity Humane Society International worked with Prada after running a public campaign urging the brand to drop fur last September. Pictured is a Prada mink fur scarf £510

The change will come into effect in February, after Prada’s Spring/Summer 2020 women’s collection.  

PJ Smith, Director of Fashion Policy at the Humane Society of the United States, said, ‘With Prada’s fur-free announcement, one of the biggest names in fashion just became a leader in animal welfare and innovation for generations to come.’

However International Fur Federation CEO Mark Oaten said: ‘I am surprised that a brand who care about sustainability are banning a natural product like fur. 

‘Now Prada customers will only have plastic fur as an option, which is bad for the planet. I urge Prada to think again and trust its own consumers to decide if they want to buy real or fake fur. ‘ 

The fashion house said they will no longer use fur after February 2020 and the Spring/Summer women’s collection. Pictured is Prada’s £ 1,355 fox fur hat with a fox fur tail

Humane Society International, who worked with Prada to ditch the fur, is also campaigning to make Britain Fur Free which is supported by Fearne Cotton, pictured

Prada is a globally renowned as a fashion powerhouse, and has 10 outlets in the United Kingdom including its flagship store in Old Bond Street, London.   

Since the beginning of 2017 several designers including Burberry, Versace, Gucci and Chanel have gone fur-free.

Other brands that have ditched fur include Coach, Donna Karan, Michael Kors/Jimmy Choo, Diane von Furstenberg, Columbia Sportswear, Farfetch, Yoox Net-a-Porter, Burlington, VF Corporation (Timberland/The North Face) Furla and Bottega Veneta.

Designers still selling fur in the UK include Fendi, Max Mara, Celine, Valentino, Saint Laurent, Dolce & Gabbana.

Humane Society International/UK which runs the celebrity-backed #FurFreeBritain campaign for a UK fur sales ban, believes Prada’s stance will send a clear message to the government that it’s time to make Britain a fur-free zone as well.

Claire Bass, Executive Director of HSI/UK, said: ‘Anti-fur policies like Prada Groups’s prove that forgoing fur isn’t a fast-fashion trend, it’s a step change to meet the demands of ever more socially and environmentally conscious consumers. 

‘As well as being unspeakably cruel, fur is also a nightmare for the environment, using and producing a cocktail of pollutants. 

Anti-fur protesters scuffled with security guards outside the Burberry Fashion Show at the Dimco Buildings, part of the London Fashion Week events, in February 2018

Designers still selling fur in the UK include Fendi, Max Mara, Celine, Valentino, Saint Laurent, Dolce & Gabbana. Pictured is a protester outside London Fashion Week last year

‘Fashion leaders like Prada, Gucci and Burberry are clear that fur has had its day, and fur sales bans are being considered in New York and California; now is the moment for the UK government to shine on its commitments to animal welfare and make Britain the first country in the world to ban the sale of animal fur.’

HSI UK’s #FurFreeBritain campaign is supported by a host of celebrities including Ricky Gervais, Alesha Dixon, Paloma Faith, Fearne Cotton and Simon Pegg.  

Although fur farming was outlawed in the UK on moral grounds in 2000, Britain still imports and sells fur from countries such as Finland, China and Italy from a range of other species such as fox, rabbit, mink, coyote, racoon dog and chinchilla. 

According to the most recent trade statistics from HMRC, in 2018 the UK imported over £70million of animal fur. 

A UK fur sales ban would follow on from bans in US cities, including San Francisco and Los Angeles.

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